Regulation Crowdfunding

The anti-child trafficking thriller “Sound of Freedom” just opened in theatres on July 4th.  Based on a true story, it stars Jim Caviezal as former Homeland Security special agent Tim Ballard who quits his job with the agency and embarks on a mission to rescue children from traffickers in Latin America.  Another true story relating to the film is that the cost of marketing it has been funded through an equity crowdfunding campaign under Regulation CF.  What makes it even more interesting is that the investment instrument issued in this crowdfunding offering was not your typical stock, convertible note or SAFE, but rather something called a revenue participation right.Continue Reading Revenue Participation Rights as a Crowdfunding Instrument Alternative

What do founders, employees and investors in privately held companies all have in common?  Limited opportunity to sell their shares.  That’s because of various legal, contractual and market factors that impede the sale of such securities, so liquidity is usually limited to acquisition of or public offering by the company. In recent years, there’s been

A new reality streaming television series called Unicorn Hunters debuts May 10 in which startups will pitch to a panel that includes Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak, and the panelists after grilling the entrepreneurs will make decisions on whether or not to invest, similar to Shark Tank.  But unlike the couch potato viewers of Shark

Perhaps the most vexing threshold issue faced by any company considering a capital raise is which securities exemption to pursue.  The chosen exemption largely depends on the targeted amount of the raise, as well as the manner in which potential investors will be solicited and the type of disclosure to be provided.  But this presents

A freeze on government regulation is generally perceived by most people as being a positive development for private enterprise.  Not necessarily so, however, when the regulation being frozen is itself a reform of preexisting regulatory burdens.

Among the many Presidential Actions taken by President Biden on his first day in office was one entitled Regulatory

You just raised $1 million in your crowdfunding offering under Title III/Regulation CF.  That’s the good news.  The bad news?  You now have over a thousand shareholders on your cap table, making it unwieldy, an administrative nightmare and likely to impede future funding.  It means a huge challenge seeking consents for such things as director

Last month, the Securities and Exchange Commission passed sweeping reforms of the rules governing exempt offerings (the “2020 Reforms”) to make it easier for issuers to move from one exemption to another, to bring clarity and consistency to the rules governing offering communications, to increase offering and investment limits and to harmonize certain disclosure requirements

On November 2, 2020, the SEC adopted significant rule amendments to simplify, harmonize and improve the exempt offering framework to facilitate capital formation and investment opportunities in startups and emerging companies. The rule amendments were initially proposed in March 2020, and first conceived in a concept release in June 2019.  The reforms simplify the integration